Industry News

Defination of tannic acid

2021-11-23





Defination of tannic acid


Tannins, also known as tannic acid, are phenolic compounds found in woody flowering plants that are important deterrents to herbivores and have many industrial applications.  Tannins, as secondary metabolites, are sequestered in vacuoles within plant cells to protect other cellular components.  They are commonly found in the roots, wood, bark, leaves and fruits of many plants, especially in the oak (oak) species and in the bark of suaq (rus) and wood olive (Terminalia chebula).  They also appear in galls, pathologic growths caused by insect attacks.  
 
Commercial tannins are usually a pale yellow to light brown amorphous substance in powder, flake or spongy form.  They are mainly used for tanning leather, dyeing fabrics, inking and various medical applications.  Tannin solutions are acidic and have an astringent taste.  Tannins contribute to the astringency, color, and certain flavors of black and green tea.  
 
Tannins are found in the hard shells formed by insects on the branches of certain oak trees (infected oak and other oak species).  It was taken out and used as medicine.  
 
Tannic acid has historically been used in "universal antidotes" along with activated carbon and magnesium oxide, previously used in poisonings.  The combination of these three ingredients is thought to be better at absorbing toxins than any of them alone.  Unfortunately, the activated carbon absorbs the tannic acid and more or less inactivates it.  This makes the combination less effective.  
 
Tannins are now applied directly to the affected areas to treat cold sores and hot blisters, diaper rash and heat rash, poison ivy, ingrown toenails, sore throats, tonsil pain, swollen or shrinking gums, rashes;  And stop bleeding.  
 
Tannins can also be taken orally and used directly for bleeding, chronic diarrhea, dysentery, blood in the urine, joint pain, persistent cough and cancer.